Currently Browsing: Podiatry

Diabetic Foot Care: Ulcers

Diabetic Foot Care: Ulcers
People who have diabetes are at a higher risk for certain health issues and other conditions. Because of nerve damage, the feet are particularly sensitive to certain issues. Diabetic foot care involves recognizing the danger that results from small cuts and wounds. These can easily evolve into foot ulcers (sores). What Is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? Diabetic foot ulcers are foot sores. They develop in an area where the skin has broken down in some fashion. You may have suffered a cut to your foot from wearing sandals on an IL sidewalk, or simply cracking your skin. In normal circumstances, the tissue and the skin surface of a healthy individual heal quickly. However, if you have diabetes, this does not occur. Instead of healing, the foot develops an ulcer. Why Do Diabetic Foot Ulcers Occur If you have diabetes, your condition makes you more susceptible to diabetic foot. The two most prominent contributory factors are: *Neuropathy (Nerve Damage): If you have diabetes, the nerves in your feet are not functioning normally. The disease damages them over time. In fact, the longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are going to end up with incapable of feeling your feet. This, in turn, results in various bumps and cuts going unnoticed until you may actually require specialized diabetic foot care. *Peripheral Arterial Disease: This disease results in a narrowing of the arteries. It influences the blood flow to the extremities of your body, particularly the feet. With less blood flowing to your feet, circulation decreases producing an inability to heal quickly. Diabetic lesions will also form because of a combination of neuropathy, peripheral heart disease, and infection. Diabetic Foot Care If you live in NJ and are concerned about suffering your feet and diabetic foot ulcers, contact your doctor. He or she can arrange for you to see a podiatrist. They can talk to you about implementing a simple program of diabetic foot care. At Suburban Foot & Ankle Associates, their team of professionals in Joliet IL is always there to help you with any foot disorders. From Achilles tendonitis to Diabetic Foot Care, we are there to advise you on how to improve how you care for your feet. For more information on who they are, and what they do, visit them online at Suburbanfootandankle.com. Be the first to like. Like...
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Restore Comfort and Reduce Pain with Foot Orthotics in Kenosha, WI

Restore Comfort and Reduce Pain with Foot Orthotics in Kenosha, WI
You can often resolve or at least mitigate the discomfort from foot and ankle issues without invasive treatments such as surgery, but when you are seeking out these solutions, it’s important that you get professional guidance, as well. Foot orthotics are shoe inserts that aim to correct abnormal walking habits, reduce pain, and provide support, among other things, and you can obtain these from a foot and ankle professional near you. A Personalized Solution While these inserts can be purchased over the counter, foot orthotics in Kenosha, WI can also be custom-made to the specifications described by your foot and ankle doctor, and personalized shoe inserts are almost always going to be the most effective option. As slight as they may be, the imperfections in your over the counter inserts may inhibit you from realizing the full benefits. Trust in Your Foot and Ankle Professionals Whether your situation is the result of an injury, a disease, or a condition, you can trust in your foot and ankle professionals to find a solution. Using the details that are unique to your feet and condition, your foot and ankle doctor can provide you with custom-made foot orthotics that will provide maximum support. Your orthotics can be crafted to reduce pressure in certain areas of the foot or to improve the mechanics of the foot as a whole. Typically, your foot and ankle doctor will take an impression of your foot using either a plaster mold or laser-scanning technology, and by using their expertise, they can also make additional adjustments if it’s necessary. If you are experiencing pain or discomfort, click this link to learn more about the personalized solutions that you can receive from your foot and ankle professionals. Be the first to like. Like...
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Learning About Podiatric Surgery In Racine, WI

Learning About Podiatric Surgery In Racine, WI
Foot and ankle ailments can be very painful. Unfortunately, many conditions get worse before they get better. That is why those affected should visit a podiatrist. Many ailments can be treated but others require surgery. For instance, nearly half of all American women have a bunion. Bunions occur when the bottom of the big toe spreads. Further, the skin over the bunion may become red and irritated. Many blame bunions on wearing shoes that are tight. The bunion causes the big toe to affect the second toe. As a result, the second toe grows over the third toe. Consequently, wearing any shoe may be uncomfortable. The podiatrist tries conservative measures to stop the pain. Nonetheless, podiatric surgery in Racine WI may be necessary. A bunionectomy brings the big toe back to its normal position. Likewise, the bump on the foot is removed. This procedure is done as day surgery but the recovery is long. Patients have to wear a boot for several months and there will be pain and stiffness. Hammertoes are another common foot condition. The term refers to toes that are crooked or too small. Experts say hammertoes are caused by muscle issues. Further, tight socks and shoes worsen the condition. Podiatric Surgery in Racine WI can solve the problem. A small piece of bone is removed from the toe joint. Afterward, the joint is straightened and fused together. The surgeon may use a metal pin to hold the toe in place. Later, the pin is removed after the toe heals. Have you heard of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or CMT? It is a common genetic neurological disorder. CMT affects many parts of the body, including the foot. Symptoms include a foot with a very high arch. What occurs is that the muscles on the outside of the foot weaken. As a result, muscles on the inside of the foot cause the high arch. In addition, the foot turns inward. The high arch causes the heel to invert which makes walking dangerous. Surgery must be performed to align the foot with the ground. Visit a podiatrist’s website to get more information about various surgeries. Be the first to like. Like...
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Foot Injuries in Racine, WI Include Achilles Tendonitis

Foot Injuries in Racine, WI Include Achilles Tendonitis
One of the most common foot ailments, Achilles tendonitis is a condition that causes pain near the heel at the back of the leg. The Achilles tendon itself is noted as being the biggest tendon in the body. The tendon connects the heel bone to the calf muscles and therefore is often used when a person jumps, runs, or walks. While the Achilles tendon can withstand stress and impact, it also has a tendency to develop tendonitis. Tendonitis is brought on by degeneration or overuse. Types of Achilles Tendonitis So, among Racine foot injuries, Achilles tendonitis is often treated by podiatrists. When the Achilles tendon is inflamed, the diagnosis for tendonitis is made. Inflammation often leads to pain, irritation, or swelling. Plus, Achilles tendonitis is classified under two types: non-insertional Achilles tendonitis and insertional Achilles tendonitis. Non-Insertional Achilles Tendonitis When a patient suffers from foot injuries in Racine, WI, such as non-insertional Achilles tendonitis, the fibers in the mid-part of the tendon have degenerated. As a result, they display small tears, which leads to thickness and swelling. This type of tendonitis is more often seen in active and younger people. Insertional Achilles Tendonitis Insertional Achilles tendonitis develops in the lower section of the heel where the tendon is inserted in the bone of the heel. In both types of tendonitis, the damaged fibers harden or calcify. Bone growths known as bone spurs often appear when a patient suffers from insertional tendonitis. Foot injuries such as insertional tendonitis can develop at any stage of life, even in people who are not active. Foot injuries such as Achilles tendonitis are not normally associated with a specific type of injury or condition. Normally, the injuries result from recurring stress. As a result, this form of tendonitis happens when people overdo it. The condition can become especially pronounced if a patient already has calf muscles that are tight and begins an aggressive exercise regimen. Be the first to like. Like...
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What to Expect After Bunion Surgery in Racine WI

What to Expect After Bunion Surgery in Racine WI
Bunions can cause a great deal of pain and often require surgery to alleviate the issue. Along with making the right preparations prior to the Bunion Surgery in Racine WI, it pays to know what to expect once the procedure is complete. Here are some ideas of what will occur in the days and weeks after the patient gets to go home. Foot Pain It is natural to anticipate some amount of pain after Bunion Surgery in Racine WI. For many patients, the discomfort can be managed using a mild pain reliever. Typically, the worst of the pain is over within five days after the surgery. If the pain does persist, calling the doctor is a wise move. Keeping the Foot Dry While most people love the idea of a hot shower after being in the hospital or having outpatient surgery, it is important to keep the surgery site dry at all times. The doctor can provide some suggestions on how to wrap the foot, so the dressing is kept dry even during a shower. Remember that following that advice will help to reduce the potential for infection. Standing and Walking Depending on the extent of the surgery, the patient may need to refrain from putting any weight on the foot for up to two months. During that time, using crutches when standing or walking is the right thing to do. Even when resting, it pays to prop up the foot so that there is no stress or pressure applied. Dealing with the Stitches If all goes as planned, the patient can expect the stitches to be removed anywhere between a week to three weeks after the surgery. Typically, the stitches will come out sooner when no signs of infection are present; the swelling subsides according to expectations, and the incision is healing without any problems. For anyone facing the prospect of bunion surgery, click here to learn more about the process itself and what to expect in the weeks that follow. Doing so will make it easier to have everything on hand for the recovery period and improve the odds of avoiding any complications. Be the first to like. Like...
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